Salsa pattern 2

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There are lots of information about where Salsa originated from. Some say Salsa dancing’s origin is from Cuba. However, that is not totally true. If you would like to learn a bit about Salsa’s origin, you may want to check this article: Where is Salsa dance from? And What is Salsa?. In this post, we will provide some general ideas about Cuban Salsa dancing. For more detail on this dance style, there will be another article later, stay tuned!

What is Cuban Salsa dancing?

Salsa dancing is divided into many styles based on the region where these have originated. The different styles are identified as Los Angles style, New York style, Cuban Style, Columbian style, and many more. The Cuban style of dancing is mostly male-dominated and very little importance is given to techniques such as spins, steps, and dips.

On the contrary, it concentrates on a graceful movement of the couple with unique body movement, back to back dancing and arms locking in a circular motion.

How to follow Cuban Salsa dancing style?

The main theme of Salsa dancing style has no concern with what you do. It focuses on how you do it. The Cuban Salsa dancing style and the other styles more or less use the same basic steps and same rhythm. The only difference is that the couple dances around each other in Cuban Style. While in other styles, they stay on imaginary straight lines.

Cuban Salsa techniques

Most of the motion in the Cuban style does not involve quick spinning around. It is, however, have spinning or turning. But the Cuban dance style mostly focuses on the enjoyment of the music and partners than on the techniques. This is not saying that Cuban dancing techniques are easy.

It is, in fact, quite difficult to learn and master. For example, Cuban Rumba which involves the afro movements for the whole body is one of the most difficult techniques. Even people who have been teaching and dancing for many years have a tough time to master these techniques. It requires many techniques involving using your body movement, body isolation, etc.

Have a look that Maykel Fonts Afrocuban workshop, then you will understand.

The Cuban Salsa style of dancing mainly concentrates on the movement of hips. While, usually one steps with straight leg, in the Cuban style you have to step with a bent leg. In fact, no separate hip movement is done, the hips move from the difference in height between the straight leg and the bent leg. In this type of dancing, the dancer feels the floor by gently touching the floor for pushing off for the next step.

It takes years to follow and improve your Cuban Salsa techniques. This is just a brief mention of Cuban dancing techniques. Let’s have a look at the partner dancing aspect.

Another form of Cuban Salsa dancing

This is usually danced by couples but there are other forms too. In a special form of Cuban Salsa dance, people usually call Rueda De Casino. In this type of dancing, many couples dance together in a circle with turn patterns following the leading couple. The couples also exchange partners during dancing carrying out beautiful synchronized moves.

It sounds quite nice, right? However, the most confusing part comes later. That is everyone attending the circles need to remember the names of the combination or patterns. Because the leading couple will call out the combination names throughout the whole song. And, everybody will do exactly the same things. So, if you don’t know or don’t remember the names, you will be not be enjoying the fun of Rueda De Casino, at all.

cuban salsa dancing

The Cuban people are also very much fond of dancing Salsa on the streets. Every year during the street Salsa festival, a large number of people take part of in street Salsa dancing.

If you want to watch this pattern on youtube, please visit here:
For other 1-Minute Salsa patterns:

You can also go to our Salsa & Bachata music playlist for more of our collection 🙂

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